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Martha Speaks and Chick-fil-A

Tell PBS: Stop Selling Kids on Fast Food

PBS deserves tons of awards. But not for selling kids on fast food. Last year, the popular PBS Kids show Martha Speaks entered into a 4-year agreement to promote fast food purveyor Chick-fil-A. The multi-pronged campaign, whose stated goals include to “reach children” and “drive brand preference and restaurant traffic,” includes 15-second ads for Chick-fil-A before and after Martha Speaks TV episodes; advertising on the PBS Kids’ website; and in-store promotions at more than... Read more...

Seven-year-olds on Facebook?

Facebook, which has revolutionized marketing and transformed the social life of teens and adults, is looking to target children.(1) It’s a terrible idea. The wildly popular social networking site isn’t safe for children. For one thing, they are particularly vulnerable to Facebook’s brand of marketing, which leverages personal information to deliver targeted ads and encourages peer-to-peer marketing. Kids shouldn’t be subjected to a barrage of advertising honed specifically to who they are—... Read more...

2012 School Bus Ad Action Center

The commercialization of our schools could get a lot worse in the coming months. Currently, only Texas, Arizona, Colorado, Tennessee, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico allow advertising on the exterior of school buses. Some others allow ad inside school buses. But more states are considering overturning their long-standing prohibitions on school bus ads in a misguided attempt to solve their budget deficits. The financial plight of schools is extremely worrisome, but... Read more...

Support the Do Not Track Kids Act

We have an important opportunity to help protect children’s and teens’ privacy online. H.R. 1895, the Do Not Track Kids Act of 2011(1), will limit companies’ ability to track children on the web or through mobile devices and empower parents to protect their kids.  CCFC is proud to endorse this important legislation. Will you email your representative today and ask him or her to co-sponsor the Do Not Track Kids Act?  Tracking the online movements of children and teens—and... Read more...

Tell Nickelodeon: Stop Bombarding Preschoolers with SpongeBob

Yesterday, children’s broadcaster Nickelodeon made a startling admission: its hit show SpongeBob SquarePants—whose star is featured on countless products designed for toddlers and preschoolers—is not intended for children under six. Nickelodeon was responding to a brand new study that found that watching the fast-paced SpongeBob SquarePants has a negative influence on preschoolers' executive function. Children who watched nine minutes of the show scored... Read more...

Tell Kmart: Stop Stealing Taxpayer-Funded Class Time

Thanks to you, Scholastic is significantly scaling back its InSchool Marketing Division.  Now we’ve set our sights on the most insidious in-school advertiser of all: Channel One News.  For more than 20 years, Channel One News has forced students to watch a 12-minute daily “newscast” (many of the stories are actually fluff pieces promoting music or movies) that includes 2 minutes of commercials.  Schools showing Channel One lose a full week of instructional time each school year to the... Read more...
FruitLoops.com

Tell Big Food CEOs: Stop Sabotaging Guidelines That Protect Children's Health

August 17, 2011 — Government agencies led by the Federal Trade Commission have proposed voluntary guidelines for food marketing to children.  The guidelines are far from perfect—real regulation with enforcement mechanisms is the best way to improve the food environment for children—but they represent an important step. The food and advertising industries are aggressively lobbying Congress to kill the guidelines.  They’ve hired high-powered lobbyists; flown in company CEOs to meet with the... Read more...

Do preschoolers need mandatory screen time?

May 25, 2011 — If we don’t act now, the pressure on early childcare programs to incorporate screen time into their core curriculum will intensify.  With preschoolers already spending an average of 32 hours per week with screens outside of classrooms, the last thing they need is mandatory screen time in school or daycare.  The National Association for the Education of Young Children has issued a draft of its new position statement on Technology in Early Childhood Programs. ... Read more...

Tell Scholastic: Stop Selling Kids on Coal

On Friday, May 13, Scholastic announced that it would stop distributing “The United States of Energy,” a controversial fourth grade curriculum paid for by the American Coal Foundation.  The materials were also removed from Scholastic’s website. Thanks to all of you who participated in this imortant campaign -- your emails made a difference. To read CCFC's statement, click here. To read our email to members, click here. Why is Scholastic promoting coal to 4th graders? Because the coal industry... Read more...

Tell Scholastic: In-School Marketing Does Not Equal Education

Earlier this week, we told you how Scholastic, in response to a campaign led by CCFC and Rethinking Schools, stopped distributing a controversial fourth grade curriculum paid for by the coal industry.  More importantly, Scholastic announced that it will review its policies and editorial procedures on all sponsored classroom materials. It’s a critical moment for anyone who cares about quality education.  One of the world’s largest educational publishers is listening to your concerns.  And since... Read more...

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