School Commercialism

Statement of CCFC’s Dr. Susan Linn on “A National Survey of the Types and Extent of the Marketing of Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value in Schools.”

Date of Release: 

Tuesday, September 19, 2006

September 19, 2006
Contact:  Josh Golin (617-896-9369; josh<at>commercialfreechildhood.org)      
For Immediate Release

Statement of CCFC’s Dr. Susan Linn on “A National Survey of the Types and Extent of the Marketing of Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value in Schools.”

Channel One Promotes "Not Safe For School" Pics in Schools

by: 

Josh Golin

If you're one of the 5.5 million students in a school with Channel One News, you have to watch ads every day as part of your taxpayer-funded class time. And one thing you'll see is ads for websites operated by Channel One's parent company, Alloy Media and Marketing. One of those websites is Teen.com. Despite the name, Channel One advertises Teen.com to both its junior high and high school students.

Scholastic Drastically Cuts Corporate-Sponsored Materials

Thanks to you, schools will be less inundated with commercialism this fall.  In response to CCFC’s three-month campaign, Scholastic has agreed to cut way back its production and distribution of corporate-sponsored teaching materials.  Late last week, Scholastic contacted us to let us know that it was reducing its InSchool Marketing division—which  produces teaching materials sponsored by corporations, nonprofits, and government agencies—by approximately 40%.  And the overwhelming majority of cuts are coming from its corporate-sponsored materials.  You can read more about it in today’s

The Economics of School Bus Advertising

by: 

Josh Golin

As the economic pressures on school districts intensify, more and more are considering turning to school bus advertising as a way of ameliorating their budget woes. The impulse is understandable, but it would be great if more school boards did their homework before deciding to make compulsory exposure to school bus ads a part of children’s school day. In addition to being ethically unsound, school bus ads just don’t pay.

We did it! Scholastic Pulls Coal Industry-Funded Curriculum

Late Friday, Scholastic, one of the world’s largest educational publishers, announced that it would immediately stop distributing “The United States of Energy,” a controversial fourth grade curriculum paid for by the American Coal Foundation.  The announcement came just two days after CCFC and Rethinking Schools launched a campaign demanding that Scholastic stop pushing coal in elementary schools.  It is a significant victory for anyone who believes that schools should be free of industry PR and teach fully and honestly about coal and other forms of energy.

Scholastic's Suffocating Stereotypes

by: 

Josh Golin

From Scholastic's Firefly Book Club, for pre-k and kindergarten children:

If you can't read the small type, here it is:

For girls, it's the "Perfectly Pink! Pack: Little princesses will love these five enchanting stories -- filled with everything PINK!"

For the boys, it's the "Power Pack: Keep active kids reading with five power-packed books about rockets, bulldozers, and more."

With Students Leading the Way, Toronto Says No To Video Ads in Schools

by: 

Josh Golin

Great news! Last night, the Toronto District School Board rejected a proposal to install digital monitors in more than 70 area high schools. The monitors would have been used for news and school announcements and to showcase student projects. The catch? Thirty-percent of the air time – or two hours a day – would have been reserved for ads.

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