Violence

Play a violent game today in your Chevrolet

by: 

David Monahan

In the 1950s, Dinah Shore was all over television cheerily singing, “See the USA in your Chevrolet.” My, how times have changed. Now, a commercial for the Chevrolet Traverse encourages kids to nag their parents to buy a Chevrolet, so they can ride with their eyes glued to a violent video game—Plants vs. Zombies, Garden Warfare 2—which is age-inappropriate for many of the children in the commercial.

Beyond Winning: Smart Parenting in a Toxic Sports Environment

One byproduct of a commercialized childhood is that the values of the marketplace are adopted in all aspects of children’s lives. This is particularly clear in the realm of organized sports for children—where winning and competitiveness often crowd out the sheer joy of playing a game. Beyond Winning offers an alternative approach to teaching sports to kids. It deemphasizes short-term goals like winning and youth championships and discourages the introduction of adult-oriented, league-structured competition.

Beyond Remote-Controlled Childhood—Teaching Young Children in the Media Age

This important and timely new book by CCFC steering committee member Dr. Diane Levin is a powerful call to action and highly recommended for anyone who works with young children or is concerned about the ways that screen time and media culture are affecting kids and families. Based on her work with children and teachers over the past thirty years, Diane details the ways in which today’s media saturated environment is affecting children’s learning and wellbeing.

Tell United: No Media Violence on Overhead Screens

A family encountered a common problem recently on a United Airlines flight from Denver to Baltimore—they felt the in-flight movie playing on overhead screens was inappropriate for their young children. United was showing Alex Cross, rated PG-13 for “violence including disturbing images, sexual content, language, drug references, and nudity.” The film features “a homicide detective (who) is pushed to the brink of his moral and physical limits as he tangles with a ferociously skilled serial killer who specializes in torture and pain.”[1]

Taking on Violent Advertisements at Bus Shelters

by: 

CCFC Member Amy Vachon

For a few months now, I’ve been hopping the local bus home from work twice each week. I must admit that I haven’t been a regular bus rider for a number of years. But the experience has been pretty gratifying, with a bus stop nearby, entertaining drivers, an app that tells me exactly when the bus will pull up (wow – amazing!), and cool new bus shelters erected in our town.

But after a while, I started to notice the advertisements plastered on those shelters in between obsessive peaks at my phone to see exactly when the bus would pull up. And I started to get mad.

Parents, Advocates Demand Film Industry Stop Marketing Media Violence to Preschoolers; Urge MPAA Chairman Dodd to Respond to Newtown with More Than Words

Date of Release: 

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Contact: Josh Golin (617-896-9369; josh@commercialfreechildhood.org)

For Immediate Release

Parents, Advocates Demand Film Industry Stop Marketing Media Violence to Preschoolers;
Urge MPAA Chairman Dodd to Respond to Newtown with More Than Words

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