CCFC Blog

On August 12, 2016, CCFC’s David Monahan joined Kristen Strader and Margrete Strand Rangnes of Public Citizen’s Commercial Alert for a meeting with staff of the National Park Service (NPS) in Washington, DC. They presented the NPS with 213,926 petition signatures from the members of CREDO Action, Commercial Alert, and CCFC, asking the NPS to abandon plans to permit corporate sponsorships and branding in our parks.  The meeting was productive, and CCFC will continue to work with our partners to persuade the NPS to heed the wishes of the people and keep marketing out of our national parks. Thanks to all who have signed the petition, and if you have...
Today, Panera Bread announced a unique commitment to the wellbeing of children: they will not use toys, characters, or other enticements to sell their kids’ meals, and they’re challenging other restaurants to do the same. Their pledge is part of a broader Kids Meal Promise, which aims to reshape the way people think about kids’ food. For us, it’s an important and exciting step toward ending child-targeted marketing. You hear a lot from us when corporations exploit children’s vulnerabilities in order to build brand loyalty, and food marketers are some of the...

CCFC supporter Tanya Palacio sent this photo of Stonyfield yogurt with a Dinotrux ad 

We are constantly reminded of the role our supporters play in opposing exploitive practice of child-targeted marketing. Here is another example. Tanya Palacio, a CCFC supporter from Silver Spring, Maryland, was upset to see Disney and DreamWorks’ characters on the Stonyfield Organic yogurt she purchases for her kids. She shared with us this email she sent to Stonyfield: Our family have been long time customers of your yogurt (and milk). I have a 5 year old and a 2 year old. Your company’s philosophy about making organic healthy food really resonates with me. However, I see that you are now having Disney advertisements on your yogurt. It's disappointing to see a wholesome company succumb to marketing to children. Your product is awesome and...

Jean and her son Scott, who survived into young adulthood sans Pokemon cards

When my son, Scott, was in first grade, he came home completely agitated one day. “Mom!” he pleaded urgently, “Can we get Pokemon cards? Everyone has them!” The following conversation ensued: Me: “No, Scott, we don’t need Pokemon cards. You know we don’t watch the show. All they do is fight.” Scott: “Austin has a Pokemon lunchbox!” Me: “Scott, we are not getting Pokemon cards.”  He screwed up his face and stamped his little 6-year-old foot. End of discussion.  Just kidding. In the following weeks, Scott came home insistent that he would not be accepted into the first grade social scene unless we bought the cards. He obsessively discussed the problem at dinner, implored his older sister to persuade me on his behalf and had frequent replays...
I’m so excited about the real progress we’re making shielding children from invasive advertising. Our ongoing campaign to keep ads off of school buses is just one example.  Several years ago, marketers started pushing state legislators to allow ads on the outside of buses, wowing them with false promises of big money for school districts. Pundits predicted that the plain yellow school bus would soon be a thing of the past. Thanks to your support, that hasn’t happened. From 2011 through this year, states introduced 36 bills that would allow school districts to place ads on...
On May 24, advocacy groups, teachers, parents, and youth gathered at the huge “Rock n Roll” McDonald’s in downtown Chicago to loudly demand: Stop McTeacher’s Nights! The rally was held just two days before the McDonald’s Annual Shareholder meeting and a short drive from the company’s headquarters. The speeches, signs, and protest chants revolved around one theme: McDonald’s should not target kids and capitalize on student-teacher relationships with junk food “fundraisers” that return little to schools. A group of young students from Chicago’s Academy for Global Citizenship gave an inspiring presentation, asking McDonald’s to stay out of schools and stop encouraging unhealthy habits. Thanks to our partners at Corporate Accountability...
From May 2-8, thousands of people across the United States and around the world celebrated Screen-Free Week. Thanks so much to all the SFW organizers who rallied their families, schools, and communities to participate! Screen-Free Week Everywhere From Maine to California, and everywhere in between, organizers planned amazing screen-free events and activities. There was Photography Day at the LeDuc Historic Estate in Hastings, MN, a Family Fitness Fair put on by the Department of Health in Charlotte County, FL, sensory play time and other activities at the Brighton District Library in Michigan, a Cinco de Mayo celebration at Maplewood Elementary School in Austin, TX, and a daytime campfire and a cave hike at the Lake Roland...
I remember crossing paths with Thomas the Tank Engine when my son, Ayhan, was about a year old. Our local library had a weekly story and Lego Time, which became a regular Saturday morning outing for my son and me. Ayhan was instantly attracted to the Duplo train set, which happened to take on the persona of a certain blue engine. At first, I kept said train nameless, but many children at Lego Time loved Thomas (and how can you not love a train with a happy big-eyed face?) and many were...
Great news! Bloomberg News reports that sales of Mattel’s Hello Barbie are extremely weak. Together, we convinced parents to leave the creepy, eavesdropping doll on the shelf! Long before the doll’s release, CCFC publicized how Hello Barbie would threaten children’s privacy, creativity, and wellbeing. Nearly 45,000 people signed our petitions urging Mattel not to release the doll that records and analyzes children’s conversations, and our concerns were featured in media outlets around the world, including the Washington Post and Fox News. In November, just before the doll hit stores, we enlisted experts to help us tell...
I was thrilled to attend the National Conference of the Network for Public Education (NPE) on April 16 and 17 in Raleigh, North Carolina. NPE shared the Convention Center with a local Comic Con, but even without capes and masks our event had the true superheroes: educators fighting for children and our communities. The theme of this year’s conference: “And Justice for All: Strengthening Public Education for Each Child.” Some groups are canceling events in North Carolina in solidarity with those oppressed by the state legislature’s passage of HB2, which nullified local ordinances protecting the LGBT community. But with the news of HB2 coming so close to this conference, NPE President Diane Ravitch boldly announced: “We are going to North...

Pages

Subscribe to CCFC Blog